The Book: Data Ethics of Power (Edward Elgar Publishing)

Publication Date: December 2021 ISBN: 978 1 80220 310 3

Data Ethics of Power takes a reflective and fresh look at the ethical implications of transforming everyday life and the world through the effortless, costless, and seamless accumulation of extra layers of data. By shedding light on the constant tensions that exist between ethical principles and the interests invested in this socio-technical transformation, the book bridges the theory and practice divide in the study of the power dynamics that underpin these processes of the digitalization of the world.

Gry Hasselbalch expertly draws on nearly two decades of experience in the field, and key literature, to advance a better understanding of the challenges faced by big data and AI developers. She provides an innovative ethical framework for studying and governing Big Data and Artificial Intelligence. Offering both a historical account and a theoretical analysis of power dynamics and their ethical implications, as well as incisive ideas to guide future research and governance practices, the book makes a significant contribution to the establishment of an emerging data and AI ethics discipline.

This timely book is a must-read for scholars studying AI, data, and technology ethics. Policymakers in the regulatory, governance, public administration, and management sectors will find the practical proposals for a human-centric approach to big data and AI to be a valuable resource for revising and developing future policies.

Book will be available with Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd

Critically Acclaim:

A recurring criticism of tech ethics is that ideas about responsible innovation are idealizations—aspirational wish lists too far removed from inequitable real-world power struggles. Gry Hasselbalch’s Data Ethics of Power: A Human Approach in the Big Data and AI Era provides a much-needed corrective. This masterful, interdisciplinary work makes a deep, human-centered case for conceptualizing and practicing data ethics as interrogating and negotiating infrastructures of power and their complex underlying cultural conditions.’

Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology, US